Is B2B Marketing Still Just One Big Popularity Contest?


Anyone who’s hoped to escape the popularity contests of highschool might be a little disappointed if they ever got a job in B2B marketing. The real challenge though isn’t just the fact that these contest are more intense from competing for high profile corporate attention. It’s also because all that intensity’s just been magnified as online technology throws itself in the mix with offline marketing.

It’s not really the fault of technology that more companies have increased integrating an online marketing approach (whether it’s just adding a page on Facebook or reformatting their email templates for mobile readers). It just sort of happened.

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How Independence Day Teaches B2B Marketers to Go Global


For the internet, Independence Day can mean one or two things. You had the regular 4th of July but you also have the 1996 movie of the same name. And with constant rumors of a sequel, it’s not a film that’s easy to forget.

Yet, that’s exactly why both the film’s legacy and message applies to global B2B marketing and outsourcing.

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D-Day – How B2B Marketers Celebrate 70 Years of its Classic Wartime Strategies


June 6 marks the day Allied soldiers descended on the beaches of Normandy on what is popularly known today as D-Day: the operation that turned the tides of the Second World War and ended the great conflict. As preparations are being made to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the landings, B2B marketers can do their part by learning the tactics which brought about D-Day’s success.

Back then, the main objective of the Allied powers was not the capture of all the landing points but rather to land in a small area, establish a beachhead, and expand from that point. For marketers, it’s basic entry strategy. You don’t just go for the entire market. You start at a particular niche, your beachhead, and start expanding your company’s own army of sales, employees, and assorted marketers.

Infantry and Mechanized Landings – Gaining Trust

In most cases, it’s easier to get a minor commitment first instead of starting with a major commitment because you can just simply work your way from the former to the latter. How do you do this in marketing? You simply establish rapport and use lead nurturing to establish trust over time. You don’t pitch your entire solution but gradually engage with them long enough to fill them in on it.

Naval Artillery Support – Demand Generation

To support the element of surprise on the German defense line, thousands of Allied naval ships helped the incoming infantry with artillery bombardments along the shores and further inland to eliminate or suppress enemy artillery and personnel.

In a way, those destroyers are akin to demand generation activities. You don’t want the competition sealing you out by consuming their territorial share of prospect attention.

Examples of this approach can include websites full of regular blog posts or sending newsletters in exchange for contact information. This will keep prospect attention on your business and support additional engagement efforts.

The Secured Beachhead – Sustainability

Despite victory at the beachhead, the Allies failed to achieve other objectives on the actual date of the landings. Hesitant decisions from supporting air and artillery support compromised the elements of surprise and helped the Nazi strongholds prepare for a better defense line.

But still, it was thanks to maintaining that little shore that the infantry managed to spread control. B2B marketers should maintain their own line if they hope to expand into deeper market territory. That includes having sustainability and reduced overhead.

Airborne Landings and Support – Inside Influence

It was the largest naval invasion in history so air support was also a critical factor against the German occupied defense line. Airborne troops paradropped behind enemy lines so that their offense ensured the attacks were now from all sides. In a sense, this is simply a quicker version of planting spies prior to wartime.

Marketers apply both forms when they gain influence from within the industry. Think of ways to drop in on critical industry influencer and win them over from inside the market. This also works with individual prospect companies. Find an insider who can vouch for your company from inside their organization and open their doors to you.

Finally, know that this land-and-expand strategy works best when you’re too preoccupied with always generating new customers. As always, B2B marketers and sales reps should follow the 80/20 rule. If it was good enough for the D-Day veterans, it should be good enough for you!


Content Marketing Tips – Where Shakespeare Doesn’t Apply


Shakespeare is a very iconic historical character due to his famous literary works that are still celebrated today. Known as one of the most greatest and influential poets in history, you can’t have National Poetry Month without hearing at least one mention of him.

William Shakespeare’s impact on language and communication extends from theatre and literature to present-day films and everyday conversation. Tag lines like “Fight fire with fire” (King John) and “a wild goose chase” (Romeo and Juliet) are attributed to him.

Yet despite the fame, is he a role model for content marketers everywhere? One would think so given that creativity plays a vital role in engaging content. However, the quality of Shakespearean work and that of good marketing can have varying standards:

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Defining the Content in Content Marketing


Whether you know it or not, your business is already using content marketing as part of the overall marketing strategy. It’s arguably the most critical piece of any inbound marketing strategy.

But how exactly do you define it? Is it blogging? Is it PR? Will this even include the content of your telemarketing scripts or email templates?

Let’s start with a general definition. Content marketing is really about providing valuable information or creative content to current and potential customers for the purpose of:

  • Building trust
  • Brand awareness
  • Positive sentiment

A successful content marketing campaign presents you as one trusted expert in your field. In turn, this makes it easier to maintain a long-term business relationship by holding your focus on it instead of just winning your daily sales quota.

Strategies in this type of marketing analyze the different ways content is found across the buyer’s journey, the customer lifecycle, and other different customer experiences and touchpoints. It also looks for means of integrating it with other (bigger) marketing strategies.

But despite the many ones you’re likely to find, they have the three objectives in common. That way, no no matter how many different forms that marketing content takes, you can keep it consistent.

  • Knowing your Buyer’s Preferences – Buyer personas have an impact on content marketing just as any other. In fact, content marketing only makes them more dynamic. You will always want to know what kind of buyer would buy what kind of product. This leads to understanding the different kinds of people who prefer different kinds of content (and in different kinds of channels).
  • Using Goals to Define ‘Better Content’ – Are you trying to build traffic? Improve conversion? Many people don’t know just how much of their marketing is using the content you create. That’s why you should try aligning their goals along with yours.
  • Adapt to Industry Changes – When an industry changes, so do the buyers it caters too. Look at how B2B marketing itself has changed because of the new trends in content marketing. Thanks to birth of search engines and social media, they have again redefined content’s role. It’s the same when you learn of other changes in your industry and need to inform the target market about these changes.

You may not even need to immerse yourself completely to understand content’s vital role. You just need to recognize what that role is. Don’t worry about giving a bigger slice of your budget for an exclusive content marketing campaign. Content itself can just ties with your other marketing goals without too much of a demand on your investment.


Online Marketing Tips – Defense Tactics from Real Life Hacks


The internet is like the ocean: it seems so open, so free. It feels a place where you can put up whatever digital property you want. But because you are free you also have the temptation to mess with what’s already there. Scariest part is you’re not the only one and not all resist temptation.

You find no better example than in hackers.

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Diagon Alley: What Your Targeted SEO Strategy Should Look Like


Harry Potter’s Diagon Alley has one very important lesson to teach us about SEO: it pays to keep your site visible only to members of your target audience as much as possible. Yes, this approach can significantly reduce the number of visitors your site receives but, if done right, targeted search can vastly improve your site’s potential as a marketing and sales tool. Here’s why and how.

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