B2B Tip #1: Getting ready is a challenge


WELCOME TO THE REAL WORLD

When we toss our academic cap in the air and cry for a minute or two. It means that we graduated in our chosen course and university. But it doesn’t stop there; our life isn’t over just because we finish college. We may graduate with honors or recognition but once we left that ceremony hall, we are entering the real world.

Continue reading


Generating Sales Leads from Companies Switching to New Markets


As Halloween is priming the consumer market, retailers themselves are realizing how much of the target market is actually expanding beyond the kiddies and the candy bags. If these retailers are your target market, it’s only natural for you to experience this kind of revelation right alongside them. Never underestimate how consumer sentiment eventually ripples out to impact B2B sales leads.

This points to a much larger reality that businesses are bound to face (especially as their startup days grow further and further away). When target markets change, it’s inevitable ripple effect on everyone in the supply chain.

Continue reading


Switching to Manual with Your Sales Leads


With all this talk of big data, bigger CRM, and cross-channel automation, you’d think that everyone in the world of B2B marketing and sales is going to look like they work on a S.H.I.E.L.D. helicarrier.

But in truth? In spite of all the tracking, sophisticated security, and big-time data crunching, sometimes it’s still better to go manual when you’re looking for sales leads.

Continue reading


D-Day – How B2B Marketers Celebrate 70 Years of its Classic Wartime Strategies


June 6 marks the day Allied soldiers descended on the beaches of Normandy on what is popularly known today as D-Day: the operation that turned the tides of the Second World War and ended the great conflict. As preparations are being made to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the landings, B2B marketers can do their part by learning the tactics which brought about D-Day’s success.

Back then, the main objective of the Allied powers was not the capture of all the landing points but rather to land in a small area, establish a beachhead, and expand from that point. For marketers, it’s basic entry strategy. You don’t just go for the entire market. You start at a particular niche, your beachhead, and start expanding your company’s own army of sales, employees, and assorted marketers.

Infantry and Mechanized Landings – Gaining Trust

In most cases, it’s easier to get a minor commitment first instead of starting with a major commitment because you can just simply work your way from the former to the latter. How do you do this in marketing? You simply establish rapport and use lead nurturing to establish trust over time. You don’t pitch your entire solution but gradually engage with them long enough to fill them in on it.

Naval Artillery Support – Demand Generation

To support the element of surprise on the German defense line, thousands of Allied naval ships helped the incoming infantry with artillery bombardments along the shores and further inland to eliminate or suppress enemy artillery and personnel.

In a way, those destroyers are akin to demand generation activities. You don’t want the competition sealing you out by consuming their territorial share of prospect attention.

Examples of this approach can include websites full of regular blog posts or sending newsletters in exchange for contact information. This will keep prospect attention on your business and support additional engagement efforts.

The Secured Beachhead – Sustainability

Despite victory at the beachhead, the Allies failed to achieve other objectives on the actual date of the landings. Hesitant decisions from supporting air and artillery support compromised the elements of surprise and helped the Nazi strongholds prepare for a better defense line.

But still, it was thanks to maintaining that little shore that the infantry managed to spread control. B2B marketers should maintain their own line if they hope to expand into deeper market territory. That includes having sustainability and reduced overhead.

Airborne Landings and Support – Inside Influence

It was the largest naval invasion in history so air support was also a critical factor against the German occupied defense line. Airborne troops paradropped behind enemy lines so that their offense ensured the attacks were now from all sides. In a sense, this is simply a quicker version of planting spies prior to wartime.

Marketers apply both forms when they gain influence from within the industry. Think of ways to drop in on critical industry influencer and win them over from inside the market. This also works with individual prospect companies. Find an insider who can vouch for your company from inside their organization and open their doors to you.

Finally, know that this land-and-expand strategy works best when you’re too preoccupied with always generating new customers. As always, B2B marketers and sales reps should follow the 80/20 rule. If it was good enough for the D-Day veterans, it should be good enough for you!


Reviving Old B2B Leads Be Like Reviving Godzilla


Good salespeople can be like a double-edged sword. They have an eye for opportunities with the best probability but are too quick to ignore anything less. Low probability prospects still carry value but that’s not enough for those whose minds are set on making the quota.

That’s why you decide to just bury these B2B leads for now in the hopes of digging them up for a long term lead generation strategy. This however also carries some other risks. It can be like waking Godzilla because there’s now an even bigger threat to the entire planet and not even nukes just cut it anymore.

Continue reading


B2B Lead Generation Tips – Don’t Be a Helicopter Mom


With all due respect to Mother’s Day, not everyone likes helicopter moms. Hovering over you wherever you go, always you watching you, and asking questions that don’t need asking? Those are major marketing mistakes companies make in B2B lead generation campaigns.

Continue reading


B2B Marketing Tips – The Art of Giving Explanations


In B2B marketing, there will be many times where you’ll have to explain the more technical aspects of your products and services. It ensures customer satisfaction and keeps you from being accused of pulling the wool over people’s eyes.

However, sometimes it feels like explaining things can be as much a difficult art form as marketing itself. What are the rules exactly?


Defining the Content in Content Marketing


Whether you know it or not, your business is already using content marketing as part of the overall marketing strategy. It’s arguably the most critical piece of any inbound marketing strategy.

But how exactly do you define it? Is it blogging? Is it PR? Will this even include the content of your telemarketing scripts or email templates?

Let’s start with a general definition. Content marketing is really about providing valuable information or creative content to current and potential customers for the purpose of:

  • Building trust
  • Brand awareness
  • Positive sentiment

A successful content marketing campaign presents you as one trusted expert in your field. In turn, this makes it easier to maintain a long-term business relationship by holding your focus on it instead of just winning your daily sales quota.

Strategies in this type of marketing analyze the different ways content is found across the buyer’s journey, the customer lifecycle, and other different customer experiences and touchpoints. It also looks for means of integrating it with other (bigger) marketing strategies.

But despite the many ones you’re likely to find, they have the three objectives in common. That way, no no matter how many different forms that marketing content takes, you can keep it consistent.

  • Knowing your Buyer’s Preferences – Buyer personas have an impact on content marketing just as any other. In fact, content marketing only makes them more dynamic. You will always want to know what kind of buyer would buy what kind of product. This leads to understanding the different kinds of people who prefer different kinds of content (and in different kinds of channels).
  • Using Goals to Define ‘Better Content’ – Are you trying to build traffic? Improve conversion? Many people don’t know just how much of their marketing is using the content you create. That’s why you should try aligning their goals along with yours.
  • Adapt to Industry Changes – When an industry changes, so do the buyers it caters too. Look at how B2B marketing itself has changed because of the new trends in content marketing. Thanks to birth of search engines and social media, they have again redefined content’s role. It’s the same when you learn of other changes in your industry and need to inform the target market about these changes.

You may not even need to immerse yourself completely to understand content’s vital role. You just need to recognize what that role is. Don’t worry about giving a bigger slice of your budget for an exclusive content marketing campaign. Content itself can just ties with your other marketing goals without too much of a demand on your investment.


B2B Telemarketing Tips – Getting Easter Eggs Along Dangerous Routes


In most video games, you may have heard of a term called event flags, the activation of certain events as you progress that also doubles as important points in a game’s plot or story. Example, when you bump into a girl on the street but it turns out they’re actually the princess/love interest/new party member etc. That point when you decide to talk is considered a flag.

Similar cases happen in real life and right within the process of B2B telemarketing. You hear stories of marketers struggling with a prospect but days later finally began communicating after another customer referred them. That’s a typical success story but one that certainly follows the event flag routine.

Continue reading


Using Outbound to Amp Up Social Lead Generation


Old and costly they may be, plenty of creative professionals still list outbound marketing as part of their strategies (despite the increasing doubt on their effectiveness).

Marketers have always been speculating if this age of digital and social media has whether or not spelled the end of outbound marketing. But despite these rumors, there are those who still say such speculation is largely overrated and that businesses shouldn’t be so quick to retire their outbound marketing resources.

Continue reading